"The Law of Diminishing Returns, true in life as well as in story is this: The more often we experience something, the less effect it has. Emotional experience, in other words, cannot be repeated back-to-back with effect…. Suppose a story contains three tragic scenes contiguously. What would be the effect? In the first, we shed tears; in the second, we sniffle; in the third, we laugh… loudly. Not because the third scene isn’t sad … but because the previous two have drained us of grief and we find it insensitive, if not ludicrous, of the storyteller to expect us to cry yet again."

Robert McKee, Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting

The best explanation I’ve seen yet of why constant angst is so frustrating to me, in everything from Wuthering Heights to fanfic.

(via glamaphonic)

(Source: christinelinnell, via bluandorange)

Tags: Words

Tags: Words

giandujakiss:

Transformative Works and Cultures: Vol 17 (2014)

acafanmom:

New issue posted today, and several essays/interviews/reviews that may be of interest to people here:

Redefining gender swap fan fiction: A Sherlock case study - Ann McClellan

Bull in a china shop: Alternate Reality games and transgressive fan play in social media franchises - Burcu Bakiolgu (phdfan, this might interest you?)

Twinship, incest, and twincest in the Harry Potter universe - Vera Cuntz-Leng

Queer encounters between Iron Man and Chinese boy’s love fandom - John Wei

Fan fiction metadata creation and utilization within fan fiction archives: Three primary models - Shannon Fay Johnson (destinationtoast, this might be of interest?)

Fan fiction and midrash: Making meaning - Rachel Barenblat

Wordplay, mindplay: Fan fiction and postclassical narratology - Veerle Van Steenhuyse

Fandom and the fourth wall - Jenna Kathryn Ballinger

Exploring fandom, social media, and producer/fan interactions: An interview with Sleepy Hollow’s Orlando Jones - Lucy Bennett and Bertha Chin

And much more! Check it out - this is FREE. OPEN ACCESS. Read! Enjoy! :)

(via flintlock)

Tags: Words

Tags: Anatomy gif

Tags: Exteriors

wallabri:

just a few quickie sketches of my tophat magician object head, who still requires a name. 

Tags: Clothing Art

leseanthomas:

NYC in the 1980s.

Love.

Memories.


After picking up a camera at the age of 15, Jamel Shabazz has been unknowingly become the first “visual documentarian” of hip hop. For over 30 years he’s captured the world around him. Every frame  of that world is a time portal that sparks emotion stemming from the scenes they represent. And if there is ever a glimpse into the foundations of street wear and its surrounding culture, it can be found in the pages of his first book.

“Back In The Days” is real deal documentation as it pertains to the origins of hip hop, not to mention hip hop fashion. No 2oK a day models. No makeup artists. No food trucks. The models in the book don’t need runways because they lived the life of style. Jamel Shabazz was there to capture it all.”

Purchase here: http://www.jamelshabazz.com/monographs.html

(via xekstrin)

Tags: Clothing

chrissyplaysdressup:

Photos of my hobbit costume :P we were very busy that day, didn’t have much time to get any pics at all XD but hey that’s what it looked like basically! At least I’ve fixed the wig hehe

(via foxboros)

Tags: Clothing

blackfashion:

Nike Pro Bra, Zara Trousers, Zara Bomber Jacket, Nike Free Run Sneakers
Nichole, Washington, DC
http://nicholealabi.com
@nicholealabi

blackfashion:

Nike Pro Bra, Zara Trousers, Zara Bomber Jacket, Nike Free Run Sneakers

Nichole, Washington, DC

http://nicholealabi.com

@nicholealabi

thecivilwarparlor:

Missing Chapter From America’s History Books
One In Four Of America’s Cowboys Were African-American
Many of the slaves in the 17th and 18th centuries were familiar with cattle herding from their homelands of West Africa. This brings historians the question of the name “Cowboy” and whether or not it was made from slave cow herders.
On some Texas trails, about a quarter of cowboys were black.
African American cowboys were largely African American freedmen after the Civil War who were drawn to cowboy life, in part because there was not quite as much discrimination in the west as in other areas of American society at the time. For enslaved Blacks the West offered freedom and refuge from the bonds of slavery. It also gave African Americans a chance at better earnings. . After the Civil War many were employed as horsebreakers and for other tasks, but few of them became ranch foremen or managers. Some black cowboys took up careers as rodeo performers or were hired as federal peace officers in Indian Territory. Others ultimately owned their own farms and ranches.
Hundreds of black cowboys were among the very first hands who drove huge herds along trails to Abilene, Kansas, the cattle-selling center of the Old West.  They were especially skilled in vetting horses. When herding cattle, many black riders rode “on point,” ahead of the dust. Black cowboys were forced to do the hardest work with cattle, such as bronco busting, they had special skills with breaking in steeds.
Photo: No original source found, possible circa 1913 http://www.geni.com/projects/Black-Cowboys/1986
http://blackamericaweb.com/2012/11/19/little-known-black-history-fact-black-cowboys/
http://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=24166

thecivilwarparlor:

Missing Chapter From America’s History Books

One In Four Of America’s Cowboys Were African-American

Many of the slaves in the 17th and 18th centuries were familiar with cattle herding from their homelands of West Africa. This brings historians the question of the name “Cowboy” and whether or not it was made from slave cow herders.

  • On some Texas trails, about a quarter of cowboys were black.

African American cowboys were largely African American freedmen after the Civil War who were drawn to cowboy life, in part because there was not quite as much discrimination in the west as in other areas of American society at the time. For enslaved Blacks the West offered freedom and refuge from the bonds of slavery. It also gave African Americans a chance at better earnings. . After the Civil War many were employed as horsebreakers and for other tasks, but few of them became ranch foremen or managers. Some black cowboys took up careers as rodeo performers or were hired as federal peace officers in Indian Territory. Others ultimately owned their own farms and ranches.

  • Hundreds of black cowboys were among the very first hands who drove huge herds along trails to Abilene, Kansas, the cattle-selling center of the Old West.  They were especially skilled in vetting horses. When herding cattle, many black riders rode “on point,” ahead of the dust. Black cowboys were forced to do the hardest work with cattle, such as bronco busting, they had special skills with breaking in steeds.

Photo: No original source found, possible circa 1913 http://www.geni.com/projects/Black-Cowboys/1986

http://blackamericaweb.com/2012/11/19/little-known-black-history-fact-black-cowboys/

http://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=24166

(via rosezemlya)

Tags: Words